The answer depends on your income.

 

Your Social Security income could be taxed. That may seem unfair, or unfathomable. Regardless of how you feel about it, it is a possibility.

Seniors have had to contend with this possibility since 1984. Social Security benefits became taxable above certain yearly income thresholds in that year. Frustratingly for retirees, these income thresholds have been left at the same levels for 32 years.1

Those frozen income limits have exposed many more people to the tax over time. In 1984, just 8% of Social Security recipients had total incomes high enough to trigger the tax. In contrast, the Social Security Administration estimates that 52% of households receiving benefits in 2015 had to claim some of those benefits as taxable income.1

Only part of your Social Security income may be taxable, not all of it. Two factors come into play here: your filing status and your combined income.

Social Security defines your combined income as the sum of your adjusted gross income, any non-taxable interest earned, and 50% of your Social Security benefit income. (Your combined income is actually a form of modified adjusted gross income, or MAGI.)2

 

What if you are married and file separately? No income threshold applies. Your benefits will likely be taxed no matter how much you earn or how much Social Security you receive.2

You may be able to estimate these taxes in advance. You can use an online calculator (a Google search will lead you to a few such tools), or the worksheet in IRS Publication 915.2

You can even have these taxes withheld from your Social Security income. You can choose either 7%, 10%, 15%, or 25% withholding per payment. Another alternative is to make estimated tax payments per quarter, like a business owner does.2

Did you know that 13 states also tax Social Security payments? North Dakota, Minnesota, West Virginia, and Vermont use the exact same formula as the federal government to calculate the degree to which your Social Security benefits may be taxable. Nine other states use more lenient formulas: Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Utah.2

What can you do if it appears your benefits will be taxed? You could explore a few options to try and lessen or avoid the tax hit, but keep in mind that if your combined income is far greater than the $34,000 single filer and $44,000 joint filer thresholds, your chances of averting tax on Social Security income are slim. If your combined income is reasonably near the respective upper threshold, though, some moves might help.

If you have a number of income-generating investments, you could opt to try and revise your portfolio, so that less income and tax-exempt interest are produced annually.

A charitable IRA gift may be a good idea. You can make one if you are 70½ or older in the year of the donation. You can endow a qualified charity with as much as $100,000 in a single year this way. The amount of the gift may be used to fully or partly satisfy your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD), and the amount will not be counted in your adjusted gross income.3

You could withdraw more retirement income from Roth accounts. Distributions from Roth IRAs and Roth workplace retirement plan accounts are tax-exempt as long as you are age 59½ or older and have held the account for at least five tax years.4

Will the income limits linked to taxation of Social Security benefits ever be raised? Retirees can only hope so, but with more baby boomers becoming eligible for Social Security, the IRS and the Treasury stand to receive greater tax revenue with the current limits in place.

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.
Citations.
1 – ssa.gov/policy/docs/issuepapers/ip2015-02.html [12/15]
2 – fool.com/retirement/general/2016/04/30/is-social-security-taxable.aspx [4/30/16]
3 – kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T051-C001-S003-how-to-limit-taxes-on-social-security-benefits.html [7/16]
4 – irs.gov/retirement-plans/retirement-plans-faqs-on-designated-roth-accounts [1/26/16]

Don’t let these slip-ups creep into your federal tax return.

  

No one wants to delay their federal tax refund. As you certainly don’t, filling out your 1040 form correctly is essential. To that end, it is worth noting some of the common 1040 mistakes – the little slip-ups that aggravate both the IRS and the taxpayer.

Not signing your return. If you file online (and who doesn’t), you have to type your name on the “Your Signature” line in the “Sign Here” section, along with your spouse’s name if you file jointly. If you still file a hard-copy return, you’ve got to sign your name on the “Your Signature” line, and the same goes for your spouse on the “Spouse’s signature” line. No valid signature equals an invalid return.

Not getting your name right. Believe or not, some people mistype their names as they e-file. More commonly, they enter an old name – a maiden name, for example – that doesn’t match the name linked to this taxpayer identification number. If you’ve changed your name, the Social Security Administration (and other federal agencies, as applicable) need to know that.1

Missing the filing deadline(s) applicable to you or your business. Is your company an S corp? That means you will probably need to file a Form 1120S by March 15. Is it a sole proprietorship? That means you have until April 15 to file a Form 1040C. If you are new to making estimated tax payments, you have hopefully pored over Form 1040-ES with a tax professional to figure out how much tax is due by each quarterly payment period.2

Turning in Form 4868 (the “extension”) gives you until October 15 to file, although any federal taxes owed must still be paid by April 15. If you are a servicemember on duty outside the U.S. and Puerto Rico, you have until June 15 to file your return and pay taxes, and you can also use Form 4868 to file as late as October 15.3

If you file late (that is, you submit your return after April 15 without using Form 4868 to request an extension), you face a penalty – a 5% penalty per month following the return’s due date, capping out at a 25% maximum penalty after five months. The penalty for unpaid taxes is .5% per month after the April 15 deadline, and 6% interest a year. If you have taxes a year overdue, you will be assessed both the monthly and yearly penalties.2

Making numerical errors. Even with some of the great tax prep software now available, math errors still happen. In fact, they happen largely because people don’t use the software: the taxpayers who insist on filing paper returns are 20 times more likely to commit math mistakes than those who e-file, the IRS reports.1

If an electronically filed return contains a math mistake, it gets sent back to the taxpayer or tax professional for correction and resubmission. If a paper return has a math mistake, the IRS has to refigure it on the taxpayer’s behalf. That takes time.1

Additionally, some taxpayers get Social Security numbers wrong – not necessarily their own, but those of their spouses. Also, a smooth direct deposit of a federal tax refund won’t happen if a taxpayer types in an inaccurate bank account number.1

Selecting the wrong filing status. This happens a lot with divorced moms and dads. To determine if they should check the “head of household” box or the “single” box, they should take the online interview at irs.gov/uac/What-is-My-Filing-Status%3F.4

Claiming a credit or deduction you shouldn’t. Again, tax prep software tends to ward off this mistake. Credits often inappropriately claimed (or ignored): the Child and Dependent Care Credit, the Earned Income Tax Credit and even the standard deduction.1

Many business owners overlook deductions or claim them in error. Sometimes this can be traced back to slipshod recordkeeping; other times, it stems from faulty assumptions. According to a survey from small business accounting software maker Xero, the most common merited deductions that aren’t claimed by SBOs are those for depreciation (30%), out-of-pocket capital expenses (29%) and car and truck expenses (16%).2

Claiming employees as independent contractors. Some small business owners try to save money by doing this, but the IRS may disagree with such claims. If so, the business can end up on the hook for employment taxes related to that employee.2

So what steps can you take to try and reduce the risk of errors on your 1040 form? You can file electronically, you can use some of the terrific tax prep software available, and you can turn to a skilled tax professional to help you prepare and file your return. No one is perfect, but those are all good moves to make this tax season.

 

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.
Citations.
1 – money.cnn.com/gallery/pf/taxes/2014/04/08/tax-mistakes/index.html [4/8/15]
2 – nerdwallet.com/blog/small-business/5-frequent-small-business-tax-mistakes-avoid/ [10/15/14]
3 – irs.gov/taxtopics/tc304.html [1/16/15]
4 – irs.gov/uac/What-is-My-Filing-Status%3F [1/12/15]